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I have noticed that sometimes when I am frying beef steak it does not turn dark but it becomes rather light-colored. I have also noticed that those steaks that do turn dark during the frying tend to taste much better (more juicy, more like beef) than the light-colored ones. Just today I was frying a rump steak which turned out light gray. What explains those different results? Is it the beef quality, the preparation or something different?

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Different recipes that involve boiling pearl barley recommend boiling pearl barley for different periods of time. How long should pearl barley be boiled for, and why do different packets of pearl barley recommend different cooking times?

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My bread sometimes burn and I've checked my thermometer and it works fine. Does the oven size affect the baking?

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Kind of a strange question, but say something has spoiled, i.e. smells bad, tastes bad, etc. Will it actually always make you sick? Like for instance spoiled dressing, let's say it tastes sour, smells nasty and you eat it, will it make you sick? If so what actually makes you sick? The toxins/bacteria? or it just being unappetizing? I ask because I tried a TINY bit of ranch and while it tasted mostly fine (it was a bit tangy) it smelled quite tangy but looked fine. I also saw this article about people eating bad food and not getting sick.

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I recently had a dish at The Cheesecake Factory that had these small salty peppers in it that I really enjoyed. Stupidly, I didn't ask the waiter what they were. I made a mental note to google it later, but so far my efforts have been fruitless (or pepperless). The dish I had was called "Pasta with Shrimp and Sausage." Here's a link to their website. Does anyone know what these peppers are and how I can make/buy them? Thanks in advance.

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When I cook chicken breasts in a pan, a lot of water comes out of them. I've seen this answer: My chicken breasts release a lot of fluid when cooked. How do I prevent this? where some people suggest that this has to do with the quality of the chicken and that certain producers/supermarkets will actually "pump" their chickens full of water.

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5 days ago Bookmark It

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There are several homemade seitan recipes available, and all call for boiling the seitan in some kind of broth for a bit, then letting it cool. I'm making seitan for this "vegan beef stew" recipe. Do I need to boil the seitan first, then let it cool, then use it in this recipe? Or can I just make the seitan and use it "raw" since I'm going to be boiling it in the stew anyway? Is seitan something that wants to be twice cooked or anything along that line?

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I'm looking for a time-proven method for getting perfect egg ribbons in egg drop or hot and sour soup. The result I'm looking for is a clear soup with the classic gossamer egg ribbons. I'm not really asking for soup recipes(although feel free to share along with your answer!). I'm asking for specifically how to add the eggs. I've read plenty of "beat eggs, pour into soup", and I haven't quite been able to nail the technique. I end up with some ribbons, but a cloudy soup. This question is meant to delve into specifics. I'd like to know explicit details of your ancient, family secret. How far to beat the eggs...

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So last weekend the wife and I got a huge jar of pickles at Costco. The thing is bigger than a gallon of milk (the wife really loves her pickles). There really isn't any room for it in the fridge, but no where on the jar does it say 'refrigerate after opening', but I've always kept them in the fridge (and so does everyone else I know). I know that pickles use to be kept out of refrigeration in barrels and I realize that the salt in the brine should keep anything bad from happening, but does anyone actually keep their pickles at room temp? Are there downsides to this? Thanks

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